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Log Cabin Christmas Tree Quilt Pattern

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Assemble the Log Cabin Christmas Tree Quilt
Log Cabin Christmas Tree Pattern

Four log cabin block variations used in the Log Cabin Christmas Tree quilt pattern.

© Janet Wickell

Make the Log Cabin Quilt Blocks

The blocks for the log cabin Christmas Tree quilt are assembled in the same way as my 6" practice log cabin quilt blocks. Use that log cabin pattern for an assembly guide.

There are a couple of differences:

The blocks for the Christmas tree quilt are sewn in the four different variations illustrated on this page:

  • 10 have greens in logs: 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 13 and neutrals in remaining logs (mark logs before sewing)

  • 12 are made from only background fabrics

  • 12 are made from only green fabrics

  • 2 have brown in logs: 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13 and neutrals in remaining logs (mark logs before sewing)

    The symmetry of the brown/background block will be just a bit better if you reverse one template to make a mirror-image block. Doing that allows you to piece exact opposites, with same-length logs in each.

Make a total of 36 foundations.

Log Sizes

  • Cut center squares to measure about 1-1/4" x 1-1/4"

  • Cut a few 7/8" strips (approx.) of each color. Lengths vary -- trim away excess after sewing. Use narrower strips if you like and sew with a seam allowance that's slightly less than 1/4" (you'll need to trim-back the seams a bit anyway to reduce bulk). Cut additional strips once you're comfortable with the width.

Christmas Tree Quilt Layout

  1. Refer to the illustration on page 1 for block layout (six rows, six blocks in each). Sew side by side in rows and then sew rows together.

  2. Sew 2-1/2" wide border strips to opposite sides of the quilt and then repeat on the remaining sides. (The quilt should be in-square since foundations are still in place. Use my straight border instructions to check its dimensions.)

  3. Remove temporary foundations.

  4. Mark for quilting if necessary. Sandwich with batting and backing, and then quilt and bind.

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